Category Archives: Technology

What does it mean to be a tenure-track library faculty member?

Wow that is the longest job title, but I essentially call myself a library faculty member. I specialize in everything, but focus on library instruction, collection development, outreach, and reference.

There are many requirements I have to complete to get tenure, and one of them is to return to school to get 15 graduate credits in addition to my MLIS. If I had another graduate degree or a PhD I would not have to return to school, and the 15 credit requirement would be met.

So, I enrolled in a graduate certificate program at San Jose State University. Classes started yesterday and so far so good. I am enjoying the class discussions and it has been easy to navigate throughout the course site and the school’s website.

My assignment for Unit 2 is to create a blog post. I could have created a new blog, but why start from scratch when this blog is waiting for me!

I am taking 7 credits this semester and look forward to learning about new technologies I can bring back to Wright College Library. If I learn something cool, or have any technology tips I will post them to this blog. So, feel free to subscribe to the RSS feed.

Stay tuned!

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Presenting at the Information Literacy Summit, April 12, 2013

literacylogo copy2I will be presenting with Sharon Silverman at the Information Literacy Summit Friday, April 12, 2013 from 2:45-3:30 at Moraine Valley College in Palos Hills, IL. The title of our presentation is Embedded Librarians: Library Instruction Incorporating Learning Styles. The summit is super affordable with a $40 registration for the day at Moraine Valley College and $35 at John A. Logan College in Carterville if you live in this area.

For more information check out the summit website:
http://www.morainevalley.edu/infolitsummit/

April 12, 2013
Moraine Valley Community College (Palos Hills)

http://lib.morainevalley.edu/content/forms/literacysummit.aspx
Last day to register: April 5
Payment by check due: March 15
Payment by credit card due: April 5

April 16, 2013
John A. Logan College (Carterville)

https://secure.jalc.edu/library/ils_registration_2013.php
Last day to register: April 9

 

$30/yr for no ads on free WordPress Blog, Great! (sarcasm)

I am probably late to the party, but I was surprised to find ads on my WordPress blogs. Have I been lucky up to now or what?  I do not remember getting a notification that ads will be added to random blog pages or anything. This was a surprise and disappoint to me. I have created lots of content for students, and I do not want them clicking on ads. Luckily only 2 blogs at this point display ads.

Library 2.012 conference

I am looking forward to presenting with Norma this Thursday at 11am at the Library 2.012 conference. It is going to be a lot of fun. Our presentation is titled A Futuristic Learning Maze: A Learning Space, Not Strictly a Library . Our presentation give some historical background of Wilbur Wright College, and goes into great detail about sharing space with multiple departments, and how we coexist. It is astonishing how many departments live in the Learning Resource Center! I hope you can attend or view the recording.

Library 2.011 Conference starts next week!

Hello Everyone,

I will be presenting at the Library 2.011 conference, Wednesday, November 2, 2011, at 10:00am (CT). My presentation is titled Virtual Reference and Instruction: What is it really like?,  and I will discuss how I interact with students via phone, chat, and email. Also, how I reach out to faculty in a completely virtual environment, where I have never met a single faculty member. I work in a fast paced environment, and would love to share it with you.

The conference is FREE, and will include presentations from all over the world.

Library 2.011 Schedule for Central Standard Time: http://www.library20.com/page/library-2-011-schedule-gmt-5

I hope to see you there!

Best,

Reina

iPad is not taking library jobs

Last Monday, I heard on the radio Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr.’ presentation on the house floor of how the iPad was eliminating paper related jobs. When he said, “…librarians and all the jobs associated with paper…Well, in not too distant future such jobs will not exist.” (“Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. Says Apple’s iPad Kills American Jobs,” http://tinyurl.com/44uukrv) I said, “What!” People really have no idea what librarians do, and the skills associated with librarianship. A lot of us provide services completely online. We use databases, e-books, and other electronic resources to do research and reference. We change along with technology. If books were no longer available in print we would focus on making them available electronically. Something many librarians are already working on. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. probably just remembers the librarians that helped him when he was a college student.

Several of the skills we have can be applied to other industries and businesses. Librarians work in the for-profit and non-profit sectors. The stereotypical librarian sitting at the reference and standing in the stacks re-shelving books does not apply to all of us. I love the diversity in librarianship, and the creative ways so many librarians use their skills. How do we let lawmakers and those outside the library world know what we do? This is a question we will continue to answer. Image from: http://librarianlistsandletters.blogspot.com/

That reference interview took over an hour

Wright College Library Reference Desk

I am asked a lot of questions on a variety of subjects. I was really stumped for search terms to use in EBSCO and ProQuest for this student’s topic. The topic is rehabilitation and treatment of pedophiles on probation. I started with rehabilitation and pedophile, and a few things popped up. She already searched cognitive therapies. I needed to think about this without her staring at me at the reference desk. So, I told her I would continue to look, and check back with her. I can see her sitting at a computer station from the reference desk. She was advised to focus on the laws. Since it was an English course I decided to be more liberal with my search. Some of my search terms were: behavioral intervention and pedophilia, pharmacological interventions and pedophilia, Depo-Provera and pedophile, Gonadotropin-releasing hormone and pedophile, chemical castration, phallometric testing, and incarceration and pedophile. I removed the scholarly journal limiter and my results included articles from periodicals such as Time magazine.

I knew I was not going to get a break today. The young lady I tried to help before this student only spoke a little bit of English. Spanish was her first language. Luckily the Head of Reference was able to help her, and speak to her in Spanish.

Should every librarian be on Twitter?

Technology is always changing. Librarians should go where the users are, but some librarians refuse to join in. I know people become complacent, and comfortable in their roles. This made me ask the question: Should every librarian be on Twitter? I know some librarians feel that there library does not need a Facebook page or a Twitter account, because they think their users are not using social media. As a librarian we should know what is happening with new technologies, and be able to teach it to our users when asked. I know we cannot master every new technology and gadget. I do not know every technology, but I never back down to anything new. If a student has questions about a new technology or software I take a few minutes to learn the basics. Then explain to them how to use it. Even if you chose not to participate new technologies will be developed. They will be used by your fellow librarians and library patrons.

How can librarians improve student success

The recent news of the national search for new Presidents for six of the City Colleges of Chicago has led me to think about many issues. Four goals for student success have been injected into the new job description of the Presidents of the City Colleges of Chicago. Those four goals are:

  • “Increasing the number of students who earn college credentials of value.”
  • “Increasing the rate of transfer to bachelor’s degree programs following CCC graduation.”
  • “Significantly improving outcomes for students requiring remediation.”
  • “Increasing the number and share of ABE/GED/ESL students who advance to and succeed in college-level courses.”

After receiving this news in my inbox I began to think about how I could improve student success. As a librarian and an Adjunct faculty member of the City Colleges of Chicago it is my responsibility to make sure our students succeed as well.

I interact with students ever time I come to work. I help them with their assignments, teach them how to use library resources such as databases, and try to motivate them. I am beginning to think I can do more. I sit at the reference desk and I do classroom instruction when requested by faculty members. Why don’t we do workshops? Workshops about writing citations and bibliographies, teaching students how to use new technologies such as social media, how to do research on the internet, or use Microsoft Office. I help students on an individual basis, but making it known to all students I am here to help.

Okay, just spoke to Head of Reference and it is on. The workshop idea has been well received. I am thinking workshops at the end of my shift would be more beneficial students. Students will be getting off of work, or out of class.

I think I lost them!

My second instruction session went fine. It did not go as well as the first. The instructor was sitting in the back of the room on a computer. Some the students were talking. We were in the computer lab. So, I walked up and down the aisles to make sure they were following me. We searched the library catalog, I showed them subject headings, and we searched the Literature Resource Center database. The class was English 101. I created a blog, and discussed the more relevant databases we subscribe to at Wright. Here is the blog I created http://libraryorientation.wordpress.com/recommended-databases/. We discussed e-books, and how to search the library catalog for them. I showed them how to find full-text and scholarly journal articles in the databases. I gave them a library tour. They were really into the New York Times on microfilm dating back to 1851. One student wanted to take a look. They have an assignment where they have to print out a page from our set.

What made this session strange is the instructor’s insistence that I show the students reference books. Of course, I kept publicize our electronic databases which contain encyclopedias such as Gale Virtual Reference Library. She did not like this. So, I pulled books of the shelf. I showed them encyclopedias about religion, Chicago history, you name it! She wanted the students to make a list of 25 random reference books. I asked if she wanted me to help them search the library catalog to find item in the computer lab. She said she wanted them to walk up and down the aisles. I really lost the students when I started to pull books off the shelf.

During this instruction session the students were talking to their neighbors. So, I have decided to break the students into groups. They will search for books and articles. I created a library exercise on my library orientation blog. Hopefully, this works out the next time. I will let you know how it goes.

Image from: http://callitaweasel.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/bored-students.jpg?w=280&h=210